Man Booker International Prize: ‘Translated fiction sells more copies than fiction in English’

Man Booker International Prize: ‘Translated fiction sells more copies than fiction in English’

In the United Kingdom, fiction in translation now sells more copies than fiction originally written in English, according to research commissioned by the Man Booker International Prize. While only 3.5% of literary fiction published in 2015 was fiction in translation, these accounted for 7% of sales. Although the proportion of translated fiction was still found to be ‘extremely low’ at 1.5%, that 1.5% accounted for 5% of total fiction sales in 2015.

Literature Across Frontiers publishes statistical report on literary translations in the United Kingdom and Ireland

Literature Across Frontiers publishes statistical report on literary translations in the United Kingdom and Ireland

On 13 April Literature Across Frontiers presented a new statistical report on the publishing of literary translations in the United Kingdom and Ireland.

The report, prepared by Alexandra Büchler and Giulia Trentacosti, provides data on the market of literary translation published between 1990 and 2012. Thus, the report aims to answers such questions as: How many translations are published in English and how accurate is the oft-quoted figure of 3%?

Update available of ‘Global eBook report’

Rüdiger Wischenbart et. al. published an update of their Global eBook report. The report documents and analyses how ebook markets are developing in the US, UK, continental Europe, Brazil, China, India, Russia and the Arab world.

Thematic chapters in the report focus on critical policy debates and key driving forces, notably ebook bestsellers and pricing strategies across European markets, self-publishing, government regulation, piracy, and the expanding activities of leading global players.

LAF report on translation statistics in the UK and Ireland

New research from Literature Across Frontiers – Publishing Data and Statistics on Translated Literature in the United Kingdom and Ireland (http://lit-across-frontiers NULL.us2 NULL.list-manage NULL.com/track/click?u=0c953e8f885c8435d90e1ba74&id=f482e0ff55&e=b6138831dd) – reveals the first ever accurate figures for the number of translated titles published in the British Isles and recommends a mechanism to collect further data.

PETRA Recommendations published

From 1 to 3 December 2011 almost 70 organisations, all active in the field of literary translation, gathered in Brussels for the first PETRA congress (http://www NULL.ceatl NULL.eu/?p=2474). These organisations, based in 34 European countries (EU member states and neighbouring countries), reflected upon the situation of literary translation in Europe and discussed the development of a European plan of action in support of literary translation.

Results of survey on university curricula for literary translators have been published

In 2009 CEATL formed a working group on the ‘education of literary translators’. Its aim was to collect data on the education of literary translators, on a national and a European level, and to make these available to everyone interested.

The working group has now completed the first phase of its research, consisting of a survey on the university curricula for literary translators in the European countries that are represented in CEATL.

Survey of German ‘Börsenblatt’: translators should be mentioned on book covers

Last week, Börsenblatt, a German weekly aimed at the publishing world, contained a column (http://www NULL.boersenblatt NULL.net/550869/) by translator Isabel Bogdan on the long-discussed subject of the (in)visibility of translators. Alongside the column, the magazine ran a survey (http://www NULL.boersenblatt NULL.net/550876/) on its website, asking its readers whether they thought it is sufficient if translators’ names are mentioned inside the book they translated, or whether translator should be mentioned on the cover.

PETRA congress on the situation of literary translation and translators in Europe (1-3 December, Brussels)

From 1 to 3 December 2011, organisations active in the field of literary translation in Europe at a national or transnational level are invited to meet at a congress in Brussels to work together on the development of a European plan of action in support of literary translation.

(http://www NULL.petra2011 NULL.eu/)

The congress is organised by PETRA, the European Platform for Literary Translation with the intention of uniting all existing initiatives in the field.

Study about literary translations from Bulgarian after 1989

The Bulgarian Next Page Foundation has published the results of a study on literary translations from Bulgarian after 1989. The study, Translation and Transfer. Bulgarian Literature in Translation (1989-2010): Dates, Observations and Recommendations, can be found on the Next Page website (http://www NULL.npage NULL.org/article226 NULL.html), a summary in English will soon be available.

France: after the Assouline report, discussions open up between translators and publishers

Commissioned by the Centre National du Livre in 2008 at the request of the ATLF, the report by the journalist and writer Pierre Assouline was delivered and published at the end of June 2011. The on-line version may be consulted on the CNL website (http://www NULL.centrenationaldulivre NULL.fr/?Publication-du-rapport-de-Pierre) and can also be downloaded here (http://www NULL.ceatl NULL.eu/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/Rapport-Assouline NULL.pdf) (in French).

Diversity Report 2010: Who is translated across Europe?

As a follow up on their previous mapping and research on literary translation in Europe, Rüdiger Wischenbart and his colleagues now present The Diversity Report 2010.

As the researchers report: ‘The Diversity Report 2010 aims at portraying and mapping how a significant sample of the best renowned contemporary authors of literary fiction in Europe shape cultural diversity (and its limits) across 15 European book markets.

Second ‘white book’ of literary translation in Spain

In September 2010 ACE Traductores (http://ace-traductores NULL.org/) presented the second white book of literary translation in Spain, a project that has enjoyed the collaboration of other Spanish associations (ASETRAD (http://www NULL.asetrad NULL.org/), APTIC (http://www NULL.aptic NULL.cat/), EIZIE (http://www NULL.eizie NULL.org), AGPTI (http://www NULL.agpti NULL.org), ACEC (http://www NULL.acec-web NULL.org) and UNICO (http://www NULL.uniondecorrectores NULL.org)) as well as the support of the collecting society CEDRO (http://www NULL.cedro NULL.org) et de la General Directorate of the Book, a dependant of the Ministry of Culture.

Our Spring 2010 digital rights survey is now public

Serious concerns about legal and illegal distribution of digitized literary translations have led us to hold this survey. The main goal was to make a sort of ‘snapshot’ of literary translators’ copyright situation in the new and rapidly changing market of digital rights in Europe.

We wanted to find out:

  • which digital publication forms are already being used
  • if literary translators usually cede their digital rights or not
  • what kind of remuneration literary translators get for the use of their work for digital publications
  • what is the status of digital rights

Not surprisingly, the results show huge differences between European countries, not only with regard to the nature and volume of digital/electronic
publishing, but also in terms of remuneration.