Visibility for all translators of all genres, and most particularly literary translators, is often a matter of passionate debate, never more so than the present time. Sometimes it is a necessity for the translator to be visible. And sometimes a liability.

In this new issue of Counterpoint we look at different experiences and consequences of visibility for translators.

Mascha Dabić, literary translator and author of a novel about an interpreter, writes about the differences between being a visible translator and being a visible author.

Marta Morros Serret recounts the often stepmotherly treatment of children’s literature and its translators, and what to do about it.

Arnaud Pasquali reports how the EU seeks to contribute to the visibility of literary translators, taking into account their multi-faceted role in the book market.

Maya Hess tells the story of how Red T fights to bring attention to the often highly precarious situation of overlooked interpreters and translators in conflict zones.

From Belarus, we hear how the regime is actively disrupting the visibility of the country’s literature, by opposing its writers, translators and readers.

You’ll find this, and more, in the latest issue of Counterpoint, online now.

Counterpoint is free of charge. To download issue No. 5 (and previous issues), please click here.

If you’d like to subscribe to future issues of Counterpoint, you can register here (https://ceatl NULL.us19 NULL.list-manage NULL.com/subscribe?u=7973d1c81339f55606334c6bb&id=fb1f37b23d).

Counterpoint. CEATL’s European Literary Translators’ E-zine is an online publication of the European Council of Literary Translators’ Associations (CEATL) and is published twice a year in English and French.

Online now: Counterpoint No. 5 – Translators and visibility
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